2 Boston-Globe Horn Book Winners for Picture Book

boston_globe_horn_book_award

“First presented in 1967 and customarily announced in June, the Boston Globe–Horn Book Awards are among the most prestigious honors in the field of children’s and young adult literature.

Winners are selected in three categories: Picture Book, Fiction and Poetry, and Nonfiction. Two Honor Books may be named in each category. On occasion, a book will receive a special citation for its high quality and overall creative excellence.

The winning titles must be published in the United States but they may be written or illustrated by citizens of any country. The awards are chosen by an independent panel of three judges who are annually appointed by the Editor of the Horn Book.” From the Horn Book Website http://www.hbook.com/boston-globe-horn-book-awards/

at night

Bean, Jonathan. At Night. Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2007. 32 pages. $15.99. ISBN-13: 978-0-374-30446-1

This sweet night-time story follows a little girl who cannot sleep up to her rooftop to enjoy the breeze and the view.

Genre: Picture Fiction

Age Range: 4-8

Rating: 4 out of 5 for quality. 2 out of 5 for popularity.

Boston Globe-Horn Book Award, 2008

This simple book is a small square, with even smaller illustrations that start out as little picture windows into the family’s bedtime. All fall asleep except the eldest daughter who lays in bad, awake. Following the hint of a breeze, she climbs up to the rooftop to make a bed and sleep with a view. As she finds her way onto the roof, the pictures change in scope, from small intimate windows to whole-page night-time landscapes that the child is seeing from her makeshift bed.

The watercolor illustrations are charming and detailed the moonlight views majestic and cool. This book is attractive because of its dim and lovely illustrations, and for its simple, sleepy story.  This is a nice bedtime book, except I would hate to give children the idea to wander up to the roof alone.

Read-alikes:

Sleep Like a Tiger by Mary Logue

The House in the Night by Susan Marie Swanson

So Sleepy Story by Uri Shulevitz

 Book discussion questions:

  1. Why does the girl go up to the roof? What makes her like the roof?
  2. What other characters show up in the story?

 Booktalking:

Awake, alone at night? See the city, the moon and the water from rooftop heights.

 Resources:

Author Website http://www.jonathanbean.com/

Interview with author on Seven Impossible Things Blog http://blaine.org/sevenimpossiblethings/?p=2260

pocketful of posies

Mavor, Salley. A Pocketful of Posies: a treasury of nursery rhymes. Houghton Mifflin Books, 2010. 62 pages. $21.99 ISBN-13: 978-0618737406

Traditional nursery rhymes illustrated with embroidery and felt arts.

Genre: Picture Book, Poetry

Age range: 3-8

Rating: 5 out of 5 for quality, 3 out of 5 for popularity.

Boston Globe-Horn Book Award for Picture Book, 2011

Here is a book of traditional nursery rhymes with nontraditional illustrations. The illustrations are made by embroidery, felt, painted doll faces, and beading. The result is delightful, full of astounding details and colorful scenes. Often rhymes are joined together, creating, for example, a small townscapes for “pat-a-cake” and “cobbler, cobbler” along with “polly put the kettle on”. The trees and flowers are especially wonderful and detailed, each one covered with tiny embroidered leaves, all hand-stitched by the artist.

I found this book while looking for nursery rhymes, and it is one that never fails to please me, but I wonder if small children can appreciate the intricate handwork and substantial time that went into this project. Either way it is a wonderful book and well worth its award.

Read-alikes:

Mother Earth and Her Children: A quilted fairy tale by Sibylle von Offers and Sieglinde Schoen-Smith

Hush! A Thai Lullaby by Minfong Ho and Holly Meade

Will Moses’ Mother Goose by Will Moses

Book Discussion Questions:

  1. What makes this book of nursery rhymes unique?
  2. What kinds of objects did the artist find to put in her scenes?

Booktalking:

How long does it take the artist to embroider individual leaves in this detailed book of nursery rhymes?

Resources:

Artist’s Website http://weefolkstudio.com/

Interview with artist at Feeling Stichy Blog

Artist interview at Emptyeasel.com

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